Creating a Vision: What Could Happen?


Before you begin:

These are assignments that I have turned in for my TECH 4310 Future of Energy and Environment class, these are my own thoughts and you may not take them without citing them. I will not post them all, but a majority of them.

The book that this reflection is on is titled Thinking About the Future; Guidelines for Strategic Foresight edited by Andy Hines and Peter Bishop.

 

After constructing many alternative futures, such as the one I constructed last week (in which I successfully turned in an assignment late and got full credit due to its…boldness), it is critical to ask the question, “So what?” This question ties the future to the present, in a way that the organization can clearly understand how this whole strategic foresight activity is going to pay off for them. I found this chapter to not only be helpful for professional strategic foresight, but as I kept reading, I saw an interesting way that this could help with personal relationships as well.

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The Issue of Framing


Framing

Chapter 1 discusses how to best build and utilize a team structure for the purpose of strategic foresight. It is essential to have all members on the team, as well as the analyst, with differing points of view who are not so attached to their personal biases or assumptions that they can come together to take a look at potential discontinuities and achieve the organization’s goal for the future. The more eclectic the group, the less likely the group will fall back on “groupthink”, leading to a broader range of potential ideas to achieve the goal. The chapter offers various tactics to avoid the common pitfalls of working in a team setting, including making connections between the stated objective and how to get there.

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Energy + Nanotechnology = Future


What is Nanotechnology?

For energy, nanotechnology means the future of harvesting and transmitting energy from renewable sources. Nanotechnology in energy will solve the future problems of water, food, health, environment, poverty, war and terrorism, and the oncoming population boom.

Nanotechnology has the capability to allow humanity to store energy and distribute it more efficiently which leads to a cleaner environment with less pollution. In particular, solar energy will be greatly enhanced with the development of nanotech materials.

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Myths and Misconceptions of Climate Change, Assumptions and Concepts, Energy Dynamics, and Energy Transitions


Instructions: 

I want to see evidence of applying critical thinking and clear communication of specific course content we’ve learned from the semester—blended with your individual insights.

Describe six personal assumptions (beliefs about how the world works, but cannot prove it) that have changed (or not) as a result of this course? (e.g. Related to the role of certain energy resources, impact of human activity on environmental change, business side of energy, the politics of energy, speed of change vs market share change, et al. Hint: Reference specific content and how it changed or confirmed your assumptions) 

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Natural Gas: Different Hats


Instructions:

This week we must put on different hats.  Our aim is to avoiding writing answers as if we are staking a position on shale!  Our goal is to demonstrate an ability to describe different perspectives on a controversial new capability in global energy markets.  Your work will be judged on your ability to frame the potential risks and rewards of unconventional natural gas production. 

Describe the Dynamics behind the “shale gas boom”

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Forecasting


Baseline Forecast

Before you begin:

These are assignments that I have turned in for my TECH 4310 Future of Energy and Environment class, these are my own thoughts and you may not take them without citing them. I will not post them all, but a majority of them.

The book that this reflection is on is titled Thinking About the Future; Guidelines for Strategic Foresight  edited by Andy Hines and Peter Bishop.

The official baseline forecast compares current and past values and assumptions held by an organization or an individual, and projects them into the future. For instance, in general, professors do not accept assignments turned in after the due date. However, most of the time, these baseline forecasts are almost always wrong.

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